EasyDNNNews

Risk-Based Mammographic Screening Would Delay Detection

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

The Radiology Business Journal (11/21, Walter) reports a new study claims that risk-based mammographic screening for breast cancer could delay detection and treatment of breast cancer in many cases. The study authors wrote, “We found that many screen-detected breast cancers occurred in women without family history or dense breast tissue.” Specifically, they said that “in 44 percent of patients, neither dense breast tissue nor family history of breast cancer was seen.” The findings were published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Risk-Based Mammographic Screening Would Delay Detection Of Many Breast Cancers, Study Claims.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

The Radiology Business Journal (11/21, Walter) reports a new study claims that risk-based mammographic screening for breast cancer could delay detection and treatment of breast cancer in many cases. The study authors wrote, “We found that many screen-detected breast cancers occurred in women without family history or dense breast tissue.” Specifically, they said that “in 44 percent of patients, neither dense breast tissue nor family history of breast cancer was seen.” The findings were published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Risk-Based Mammographic Screening Would Delay Detection Of Many Breast Cancers Study Claims.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

The Radiology Business Journal (11/21, Walter) reports a new study claims that risk-based mammographic screening for breast cancer could delay detection and treatment of breast cancer in many cases. The study authors wrote, “We found that many screen-detected breast cancers occurred in women without family history or dense breast tissue.” Specifically, they said that “in 44 percent of patients, neither dense breast tissue nor family history of breast cancer was seen.” The findings were published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Most American Women Would Prefer To Get Mammogram Every Year Rather Than Every Two Years, Survey Indicates.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

The HealthDay (11/21, Preidt) reports that a study indicates “most American women would prefer to get a mammogram to screen for breast cancer every year rather than every two years.” The survey of 731 women who were an average of 59 years old on average indicated “71 percent of the women said they’d prefer a screening mammogram every year.” Women “with a family history of breast cancer and a prior breast biopsy were more likely to be in favor of yearly screening.” The research is to be presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.

Overweight Women May Be More Likely To Have Larger Tumors At Time Of Diagnosis, Study Suggests.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Newsweek (11/20, Dovey) reports that a study “suggests that in addition to being at higher risk of developing breast cancer, overweight women are more likely to have larger tumors at the time of diagnosis.” The findings are to be presented at the Radiological Society of North America meeting. 

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