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Breast Cancer Patients With Low Muscle Mass May Have Worse Survival, Study Suggests.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

MedPage Today (4/5, Ingram) reports that a study found that “a 5-minute analysis of CT scans could identify nonmetastatic breast cancer patients with sarcopenia – or low muscle mass – and an increased risk of death.” In the study, “stage II/III breast cancer patients with sarcopenia, who comprised one-third of those studied, were found to have higher mortality compared with the other two-thirds of patients.” The findings were published in JAMA Oncology.

Medscape (4/5, Harrison, Subscription Publication) also covers the story.

ACR, SBI Update Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines To Recommend That Black Women At High Risk Of Breast Cancer Begin Screening At Earlier Age.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

MedPage Today (4/5, Bankhead) reports that “healthcare disparities and unfavorable prognostic factors in breast cancer identify African-American women as a high-risk subgroup for screening, according to a clinical guideline from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI).” MedPage Today adds, “The recommendation and supporting evidence are discussed in a guideline that specifically addresses breast cancer screening in high-risk subpopulations. Published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, the guideline is the first to identify African-Americans as a high-risk group.” Debra Monticciolo, MD, chair of the ACR Breast Imaging Commission, said, “The latest scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports a continued general recommendation of starting annual screening at age 40.” Dr. Monticciolo added, “It also supports augmented and earlier screening for many women. These updates will help save more lives.” DOT Med News (4/5) also covers the story.

ACR Receives Authorization From FDA To Manage Accreditation Process For FDA-Approved DBT Units.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Aunt Minnie (4/5) reports that the ACR “has received authorization from the” FDA “to manage the accreditation process for FDA-approved digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) units, effective April 9.”

ACR, SBI Update Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines To Recommend That Black Women At High Risk Of Breast Cancer Begin Screening At Earlier Age.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Aunt Minnie (4/4, Kim) reports that “the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) have updated their breast cancer screening guidelines to recommend that black women at high risk of breast cancer start breast screening at an earlier age.”

The Radiology Business Journal (4/4, Walter) reports that the “guidelines recommend that all women have a ‘risk assessment’ at age 30 to see if they should begin screening at an earlier age and call for women with a previous breast cancer diagnosis to receive breast MRI screening.” Additionally, “the guidelines are...the first to classify black women as high-risk patients due to their increased likelihood to die from breast cancer compared to non-Hispanic white women and their increased risk of having aggressive ‘triple-negative’ breast tumors.” The recommendations (pdf) are available on the Journal of the American College of Radiology website.

HealthImaging (4/4, O'Connor) reports that Debra Monticciolo, MD, and chair of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Commission, said, “The latest scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports a continued general recommendation of starting annual screening at age 40. It also supports augmented and earlier screening for many women. These updates will help save more lives.”

Lower Screening Mammography Recall Rates Linked To Higher Rates Of Breast Cancers Detected Between Screenings, Research Indicates.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

The Radiology Business Journal (4/3, Walter) reports that research indicates “lower screening mammography recall rates are associated with higher rates of breast cancers detected between screenings.” The findings were published in Radiology.

Aunt Minnie (4/3, Ridley) also covers the story.

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